Friday, November 07, 2008

My book on Quantitative Trading is published

My book on Quantitative Trading has been published and is now available from Amazon.com. Many thanks to all of you for your ideas, comments, and support!

55 comments:

Highgamma said...

I had pre-ordered the book, so they shipped it yesterday. It is scheduled to arrive on Monday.

Good luck.

Max Dama said...

Ernie,

I ordered the book too.

I looked into it a bit on Amazon and noticed that you said you didn't know of any Matlab API offered by a broker. Here are two solutions I've been looking at: Matlab2IB and MatlabTrader. If you try them out I would very much like to know what you think. Thanks.

Regards,
Max

Ernie Chan said...

Thanks, folks.
Max: this is a great suggestion. I will check them out.
Ernie

Christopher said...

My copy was waiting for me when I got home from work today..

Steve M said...

Mine should be here tomorrow. I can't wait!

Chuck R said...

Most of my work experience has come from Network and Unix Engineering.

I have very recently developed an interest in quantitative algorithmic trading. Very excited to have come across your new book. Looking forward to receiving it next week.

I have also found "QuantLib: a free/open-source library for quantitative finance". For anyone interested in APIs.

Ernie Chan said...

Thanks, Chuck, for your tip about QuantLib. Hope you enjoy my book.
Ernie

sc said...

I just got your book. Congrats on its publication.

N N said...

Ernie,

Can you corroborate results 10%+ from stat arb books during this crisis? It seems that many stocks had little to no reversion and scanning some charts it looks like many pairs significantly diverged. Thanks!

Ernie Chan said...

NN,
Mean-reversion strategies are not limited to pair trading (see examples 3.7 and 3.8 in my book). The 10% number is from informal chatting with fellow traders and portfolio managers in the statarb space, and also from my own trading. Almost everyone I spoke to in the mean-reversion business has been in positive territory this year.
Ernie

spritrig said...
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spritrig said...
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spritrig said...

I purchased and started reading your book. It is exactly the subject I wanted a book on for years! Thank you so much for writing it.

I have been having trouble with Yahoo real time quotes which I download every second. Often in the day, updating stops, or oscillates around a false price.

What is a good source of real time price data which allows downloading multiple symbols? I use a mac, so html query is best.

Ernie Chan said...

Dear spritrig,
I am glad the book is useful to you. For real-time quotes, I use my broker's (Interactive Brokers) real-time feed. It should be free (unless you are a "professional trader"). As a backup, we also have Bloomberg, but that's much more expensive.
Ernie

spritrig said...
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spritrig said...
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spritrig said...

Hi Ernie,

On page 7 of your book you mention when you earn more money you will devote more software resources to further automate, having programs automatically start themselves up. If you use a UNIX computer like an Apple Mac, you can use the UNIX/Linux "crontab" command to set up a schedule to execute commands at specific times. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cron There may be a clone for Windows. http://cronw.sourceforge.net/

Thanks for the tip on Interactive Brokers. I am starting an account with them.

Ernie Chan said...

Dear Spritrig,
Good point about crontab. Now if I can just get my programmer to implement the Windows version...
Ernie

spritrig said...

Ernie, it looks like crontab already exists for windows. No need to implement it.

http://cronw.sourceforge.net/

Alexandre said...

Hi,
I finished reading your book over the weekend. Well done! It is very practical and very good. It gives steps to follow, and ideas or references to research.
Thank you for sharing your experience.
Regards,
Alexandre

Max Dama said...

Ernie,

Have you had a chance to check out those Matlab/IB APIs? I'd like to see a post on them.

Regards,
Max

Ernie Chan said...

Hi Alexandre,
Thanks for your compliments!
Ernie

Ernie Chan said...

Hi Max,
Yes, I did look at the website that provided the Matlab/IB api. It looks reasonable. However, I have not tried this package as I have already, at considerable cost, have my programmers build an ATS using C#. Maybe for a future trading strategy I will explore this in more seriousness!
Ernie

Maggette said...

Great read, I am no trader, but still found it fun to read...

Great book.....
greetings from Germany

Javier said...

Greetings Ernie,

I live in Singapore. I just got your book and started reading it; I am curious to know if (some of) your algorithmic strategies are suitable for Forex Trading? Which ones would be better or how would you recommend to start? Best regards, Javier

Ernie Chan said...

Hi Javier,
I haven't done any (profitable) Forex trading so far. However, if you have a good high frequency trading system, you can try to apply the Bollinger band strategy I discussed on page 23 (which was applied to ES), and see if you can reduce slippage to make it profitable.
Good luck!
Ernie

John Graham said...

Does anyone know the Kindle equivalent of page 34 in the book? Kindle doesn't use page numbers so it's hard to find a certain page. But don't give me the password!!!!!!!!!! I want to find it myself.

Thanks,
John

PS Great book!

Jacques Marsun said...

Hello Ernie,

Thanks again for an awesome book.

Example 3.1 on p. 34 provides MATLAB code to scrape Yahoo Finance for historical stock price data.

Can you offer any suggestions for Web sites from which historical *futures* price data can be scraped?

Thanks!

Jacques Marsun said...

Ernie,

For those of us with limited budgets, you mentioned alternatives to Matlab on p.33.

Do you know of any available consultants that can help configure Scilab or Octave in order to perform financial modeling and analysis?

For example: connecting to data sources/feeds and coding a few basic strategies.

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Ernie Chan said...

Hi Jacques,
I am not sure whether there are consultants for Octave/Scilab. But there are 2 ways to find out:

1) google "programmers Octave"
2) Ask the customer service at Octave.

Alternatively, you can try the programming language "R". I think more programmers are available for this freeware.

Ernie

Ernie Chan said...

Jacques,
For futures historical data, try Quotes-plus.com. It is inexpensive and you don't have to web-scrape.
Ernie

Jacques Marsun said...

Hello Ernie,

Are you aware of any errors in example7_2.m located at http://www.epchan.com/book/?

A colleague of mine tried to run it in Matlab but had problems.

Thanks!

Ernie Chan said...

Jacques,
Some readers forget to fully install the jplv7 package, and added all the subfolders to their Matlab path.

If this doesn't work, please tell me what the error message is.
Thanks,
Ernie

Jacques Marsun said...

Thanks Ernie!

We had cadf.m installed but not all files in the jplv7 package.

Best regards,
Steve

newtonlinchen said...

Dear Ernest,

I've been reading your blog since 2007, and I recently purchased your book.

Thanks for all the insights in your book and blog!

I'll try to comment here more often, maybe sharing some experiences.

Best Regards,

Newton Linchen.

Jacques Marsun said...

Hello Ernie!

Example 7.2 on pages 128-130 runs the Augmented DF test.

Could the "AR(1) estimate" be considered the mean value for the spread's time series?

Thanks!

Jacques Marsun said...

Hello again,

Are you aware of any pre-existing Matlab code that calculates the Volume Weighted Adjusted Price (VWAP) over a given time series?

It doesn't seem to be complicated code to write from scratch, but if someone has already written it... :)

Cheers!

Jacques Marsun said...

Hello Ernie,

Here's one more question tonight. Hope I'm not overloading you.

I ran Example 7.5 on p. 141 (Calculation of the Half-Life) in Matlab but received an error: "backshift not found."

Backshift doesn't appear to be in the Econometrics Toolbox by James P. LeSage. Are you aware if it is in one of the Matlab tooboxes (e.g., their Econometrics toolbox)?

Thanks a lot for your input! :)

Ernie Chan said...

Jacques,
AR(1) is an estimate of the hedge ratio between the 2 stocks. It is not the mean value of the spread, which should always be close to zero.

You can always google VWAP Matlab to find freeware for this calculation. Like you said, it is a one-line calculation so you might as well do it yourself!

backshift.m is included in epchan.com/book for you to download.

Ernie

John said...

I liked your book, but it is really annoying that the premium section of your website (http://epchan.com/book/) does not allow directory listings (it gives a 403 error). There is also no index file, despite what you say on http://www.epchan.com/subscription/spread.htm. So there is no way to know what files there are other than trying all the filenames mentioned in your book (some of which are case sensitive, others not). This also means that if you post a new file, we will never be able to find it.

Ernie Chan said...

John,
That was a temporary glitch on the part of the web hosting company. It has been fixed now, and you can see the index of all the programs at epchan.com/book

Sorry for the inconvenience!
Ernie

John said...

I can see the index for the book files now and everything is there, thanks!

Anonymous said...

Hi,
I tried running example7.2, here is my error msg (I intalled jplv7 and did set the path):

?? Error using ==> lag
Too many input arguments.

Error in ==> cadf at 57
z = trimr(lag(r,1),1,0) ;

Error in ==> example7_2 at 53
res=cadf(adjcls(:, 1), adjcls(:, 2), 0, 1); % run cointegration check using augmented Dickey-Fuller test

Any comments?
Thank you

Ernie Chan said...

Anonymous,
You may have the same lag function in different packages higher up in your Matlab path. Type "which lag" to find out which function you are using and adjust your path precedence accordingly. Call Matlab customer support if you have further difficulties.
Ernie

gray13685 said...

Hi Ernie,

I just bought and devoured your book - really on point to my situation. Especially relevant was the conclusion section where you described the importance of knowing a strategy's capacity. I've got a nice strategy, Sharpe ratio of ~3.0, and really good consistency. I'm trading it with non-trivial amounts of money (>$500K equity) and want to better understand if its capacity is 2x, 20x or 200x the current size. The answer to this question is key for me in knowing whether I've got a profitable source of incremental income or an opportunity to build a fund partly with institutional money.

I can think of a few ratios to look at (e.g., pos size relative to ADV) but haven't seen any good literature on rules of thumb of estimating.

Any thoughts or links would be appreciated.

Ernie Chan said...

Hi gray,
Capacity estimation is a complex topic.

I define capacity as the point where marginal increase in equity will not produce a marginal increase in P&L.

Others, however, may define capacity as the point where marginal increase in equity will start to decrease return.

Obviously capacity under my definition is much larger! The common sense definition of capacity is probably somewhere in between.

If you are using the second definition, the first step is to look at the typical bid-ask size of the instruments you trade. If your order size has reached the typical bid-ask size, then you have reached capacity already, unless you find a way to slice up the order and enter in small chunks at different times without diminishing the return.

If you are using the in-between common-sense definition, you have to estimate the market impact of your orders. Many, many academic papers have discussed this topic, but you can start with this blog post: http://www.maxdama.com/?p=397

Ernie

gray13685 said...

Thanks Ernie, I'll look at that blog post and the sources it references.

My strategies have hold periods of about 5 days, and I've backtested them based on getting closing price on the day following the signal (signal available after close of market on t=1 trades at close on t=2), so I'm pretty confident that as long as my order can get done within one full trading day without major impact I'll be OK.

I currently measure every execution relative to the daily close price (i.e, what was the execution price vs. the end of day close price) and consider this to be the "slippage", at least relative to the close price (I'm assuming here that I'm not a big enough buyer/seller to actually move the close, just to nudge around the intraday prices a bit). My "slippage" defined in this way is on the order of one basis point.

The journal article listed in Max Dama's blog seemed to focus on impact from size of order relative to average size of inside quote (if I'm reading this right). I'm specifically interested in size of position that can be taken over some period of time (like an hour or day) and what the impact of that would be. In some ways this is analogous, but not totally.

I'll keep going through the literature looking for a market impact equation based on TradeSize / ADV ratio

Ernie Chan said...

Gray,
You might want to google the paper by Doyne Farmer (of Los Alamos National Lab/Prediction Company/Santa Fe Institute fame) "Liquidity, long-memory and market impact".

Ernie

Anonymous said...

Hi Ernie,

Shall we use log (price) for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck to model spread for mean reversion?


ShinjiOno

Anonymous said...

Hi Ernie,

Shall we use log price to model spread for ornstein-uhlenbeck?

Z= log p1- log p2
Z OU process?

Shinji

Ernie Chan said...

Hi ShinjiOno,
You can just use raw prices for OU.
Ernie

Anonymous said...

Ernie, I really like your book, but there is a slight issue I hope you adress in future editions.

Often you present code and some output, say "p-value 0.035". However, I may use other tools than Matlab and therefore would like to
be able to calibrate my tool to yours. I would appreciate if you specified the input, too. Not only the output. Say "XLD/GM for dates 2008-01-01 up to 2010-01-01". Now I can calibrate my tool with your output. So please specify input AND output!

Great book, I am recommending it to others!

Ernie Chan said...

Hi Anon,
Thanks for the kind words on your book.

Actually, I have provided Excel input files for most of the examples in the book. Furthermore, the entirety of the source codes were displayed, so you can see the exact parameters as well.

Let me know if you have a question about a specific example where such inputs are not available.
Ernie

John said...

Hi Ernie,

Great book - inspired me very much. By the way, the function "prt" to show the data result table for the cointegration test in example 7.2 doesn't work for me.

Error msg.: Undefined function 'prt' for input arguments of type 'struct'.

Do you have any idea what might be wrong?

Ernie Chan said...

Hi John,
Thanks for your kind words.

Please make sure you added all the sub-folders of the jplv7 package to your Matlab path.

Ernie